About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CNNW 14
CNN 5
MSNBCW 4
KGO (ABC) 1
MSNBC 1
WJLA 1
WMAR (ABC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 37
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the key city aleppo. some rebels named by the u.s. state department terrorists. they designated a terrorist group linked to al qaeda in iraq. the department imposed sanctions. what does it mean to sort out good rebels from bad? nick paton walsh explains. >> reporter: not only look different, black flags, well armed and disciplined, they fight differently, too. using suicide tactics and mass casualty car bombs, radical extremists but undeniably effective. behind a stream of rebel victories, overrunning regime bases across syria, many thinking the end of assad is nearer than ever. why has the united states, who also want assad gone, black listed them as terrorists? >> we've had concerns that al nusra is little more than a front for al qaeda in iraq who has moved some of its operations into syria. >> reporter: that link clear in the document filed monday, al nusra deemed not a new group, another name for al qaeda in iraq. u.s. officials believing insurgents who kill americans in iraq fighting for rebels against assad. this move may make sense in principle but, say experts now, less
they captured a u.s. drone and issues a warning "we shall trample on the united states." >>> drunk and partying the night before he shocked the nfl and fans. >>> director kathryn bigelow talks about the controversy over her bin laden death movie. >> i think it's nice because now the film can speak for itself and i certainly have a feeling that a lot of those debates will transition to something slightly less controversial. >> the full interview straight ahead. >>> so you don't read runway ? >> no. >> before today you never heard of me. >> no. >> you have no style or sense of fashion. >> i think that depends on what your -- >> no, no, that wasn't a question. >> the devil's diplomacy. vogue editor anna wintour, u.s. ambassador? maybe. "newsroom" starts now. good morning. thank you so much for joining me. i'm carol costello. this morning iran is bragging. it claims it capture d an american drone. the u.s. is denying it. iran has made that drone a star on state tv. according to iran's state-run news agency, the drone was captured immediately after entering iranian air space. the drone, now being sh
comes amidst u.s. concerns that the assad repeople may be cooking up recipes, mixing materials for chemicals. that possible preparation is taking place at more than one chemical plant in syria, officials say. u.s. intelligence shows nothing has been moved out of the facilities, however. and officials say there is no indication syria is on the verge of using chemical we papoweapon. in turkey monday, russian president putin called the deploy ment of the patriot missiles unnecessary. but tuesday, the russian foreign minister said any use of chemical weapons has grave implications. while down playing reports about syria. >> translator: we can call them rumors, but the syrian authorities are moving a stockpile of chemical weapons or that they want to use them. as soon as we hear such messages, we prepare. >> reporter: secretary of state hillary clinton spent the day meeting with her fellow ministers as they approved a plan to provide turkey with the missiles. nato says the number of missiles and their precise location along the border still needs to be worked out. it could be weeks
. >>> now to the numbers that at first glance look like they're very good news for the u.s. economy and the obama administration, the nation's jobless rate fell to 7.7% in november as employers added 146,000 new jobs. the jobless rate hasn't been this low during the entire obama administration, but that's only part of the story. a closer look also shows a big reason behind today's drop in the unemployment rate is that 350,000 people dropped out of the work force in november. they're discouraged, many of them are, that they simply quit and they're trying to find work. christine romans joins us from new york. we saw the unexpected drop in the unemployment rate, but christine, take us a little behind the numbers that make up the headlines. >> 7.7% is that unemployment rate, the lowest since december, 2008, from before the president took office. 146,000 jobs created, twice what economists have been expecting. they really didn't see the pull back because of hiring being depressed because of hurricane sandy. maybe you'll see some of that in the next month, but this was a strong report on
there in dallas, where he will spotlight the positive impact of immigration on u.s. economic growth. this as the g.o.p. looks to attract more hiss to the party. meantime mr. bush's father, former president george h.w. bush is spending another day in the hospital being treated for bronchitis and a lingering cough. we told you about that last week when we first found out that he was there. the 88-year-old former president is in stable condition. no record on when he is to be released. ab stoddard is a former editor for the hill. bush 43 has been fairly quiet throughout the first term of the obama administration. now the president has been reelected, george w. bush sort of comes out a little bit to make this big address, why? what is the timing about, do you think? >> i think the timing was shrewd. he really made a point of staying quiet during the first couple of years of president obama's administration, saying that he wanted the about the to be able to do his job, he didn't think he needed a former president to go out there and do somed tore ra some editorializing. he gave some peaches, enjoyed hi
of state hillary clinton. the u.s. and other nations fear that the syrian regime could use chemical weapons against its own people. secretary clinton making it very clear that syrian president bashar al-assad must go. >> let me also be absolutely clear. the united states stands with the syrian people in insisting that any transition process result in a unified, democratic syria. in which all citizens are represented. sunni, alawite, christians, kurds, men, women, every syrian must be included in this process for a new and better future. martha: still far from where we are right now in the country of syria where 45,000 people have been killed under the assad regime. president, secretary clinton also promising to hold all parties accountable for what happens in syria. in other words, if assad does go, if you are part of that regime, part of the killing, part of what we've seen happening you also will be held accountable. bill: we were told the ignition process had begun for the chemical weapons. if that is the case. we were also told they have a shelf life for about 60 days. if you do not use
's going on. also later, new warnings that the u.s. should be prepared to intervene in syria's civil war. senator john mccain now says he's deeply disturbed by the latest reports that the current regime in damascus is preparing to use chemical weapons against its own people. >> these reports may mean that the united states and our allies are facing the prospect of an imminent use of weapons of mass destruction. year-end event. so, the 5.3-liter v8 silverado can tow up to 9,600 pounds? 315 horsepower. what's that in reindeer-power? [ laughs ] [ pencil scratches ] [ male announcer ] chevy's giving more. get the best offer of the year -- 0% apr financing for 60 months plus $1,000 holiday bonus cash. plus trade up for an additional $1,000 trade-in allowance. hurry. bonus cash ends january 2nd. you won't take our future. aids affects us all. even babies. chevron is working to stop mother-to-child transmission. our employees and their families are part of the fight. and we're winning. at chevron nigeria, we haven't had a reported case in 12 years. aids is strong. aids is strong. but we are str
with some sad news today. a u.s. navy seal killed during the daring rescue of an american held captive in the heart of afghanistan. good morning i'm jon scott. jenna: i'm jenna lee. when we talk about the american captive, we have a picture of the doctor whose live was saved. he is dylan joseph, a native colorado. he was in afghanistan for humanitarian work when i was kidnapped by the taliban in a province east of kabul. national security correspondent jennifer griffin is live at pentagon with more. jen, do we have any details on the american who gave his life to save this doctor? >> reporter: they're waiting to contact the family so the military does not release the identity of the seal killed in that rescue attempt. we know he was a member of "seal team 6". not necessarily a member of the same group that carried out the usama bin laden raid. there are about 200 members of "seal team 6". this man, as you said, gave his life for his fellow american. here is a statement that was read by the spokesman for isaf today. >> it has been decided to start the operations since the assessment the
service members remained. he says he remembers being on the deck of the u.s.s. honolulu like it was yesterday. >> when i got there i had the cover off one of the 50 caliber machine guns. the other was about halfway off and a torpedo went by, the torpedo heading for ship row. i thought at the time that this is really a good mock thing like that. i pull the cover off the rest of the way and about that time another torpedo came by and i saw the big red ball and i realized it was the japanese who were attacking pearl harbor. heather: he has helped id nine service members and has the names of one hundred more men that he believes are identifiable. because of his work more than 300 gravestones at the national cemetery in hawaii have been relabeled with the names of the diseased. jon: new information on the earthquake in japan we told you about earlier. minimal damage and minor injuries reported now. the 7.3 magnitude quake striking off the northeastern coast triggering a small tsunami in the same area affected by last year's earthquake disaster. residents are breathing a sigh of re
weekend at a conference on u.s. israeli issues. >> hi, everybody, welcome to the state department. >> reporter: that included this tribute video. >> i am somewhat overwhelmed, i'm obviously thinking i should sit down. i prepared some remarks for tonight but then i thought maybe we could just watch that video a few more times. >> reporter: until clinton decides her future, it's widely believed she freezes a potential democratic field that could include vice president joe biden, democratic strategist hilary rosen has her own prediction. >> i think she's going to run for president, but we're wasting our time speculating about it, she marches to her own drummer, she's not going to be rushed. >> have you talked to her at all about this, do you know if she's talked to political advisers about this? >> i have talked to her about it, and i've been shut down. >> reporter: clinton would have company. >> do you know any good diners in new hampshire or iowa. >> i will not stand by and watch the people of south carolina ignored. >> reporter: all kidding aside, paul ryan and marco rubio already
guards. after decades of gains, fewer than 12% of u.s. workers now belong to unions. in michigan, it's fewer than 18%. cnn's poppy harlow is at the state capital in lansing. how did it go? >> reporter: are an historic day in michigan. a state at the heart of organized labor in this country. one person said, if it can happen in michigan, it can happen everywhere and that's why thousands and thousands of protesters descended on the state capital fighting this legislation, which will make it legal in this state for people to work at an auto company or in public schools without being part of the union. it will be illegal for a unions or employers to mandate that employees join the union or pay any money to the union. this brings into question, what is the future of unions in america? today i had a chance to talk to the person at the heart of that debate, bob king. here is his take. does this mean the beginning of sort of a death of unions in this country? are you concerned that this is that big symbolically? >> reporter: n. >> no. i think that workers and working families are tired of lo
knows darn well he's not going to get through now. pushing out carbon heavy fuels like coal out of the u.s. energy mix. you mentioned west virginia. folks like democrats from those states are not happy about that. megyn: the nrdc says its approach will cost $4 billion a year. but they claim it will save over $25 billion each year in reduced pollution related illnesses like asthma. so we will wait and see if there's any action. thank you so much. dramatic new amateur video on the streets of serious capital. rebel forces battling government troops in damascus today. you can see rebel snipers shooting from inside buildings. secretary of state hillary clinton now raising more concerns that bashar al-assad may resort to using chemical weapons against his own people. hillary clinton saying the u.s. is worried about an increasingly desperate bashar al-assad may use the weapons or lose control of them. this battle has been exploited to some extent by al qaeda. the rebels have been infiltrated by al qaeda, which is becoming a growing force there. in any event, the concern about chemical weapons is
that a red line, and the u.s. would have to get involved if bashar al-assad were to do that. do you think that the u.s. stance is the same today? >> well, i think it is, allison, and it's getting very critical because with damascus being surrounded, or about to be surrounded, the potential, the airport as was just reported, that that may be put out of business, bashar al-assad is getting desperate and he may go to his last option which would be chemical weapons, sarin gas. we have good intelligence that they are loading up aircraft. they have moved the munition -gs from thmahmoudijah admonitions from the eug lieu igloos, where they are stored. it's a very difficult situation. nato leading from the front must get involved. we cannot let those weapons get in the hands of hezbollah, hamas, al-qaida. >> reporter: if the u.s. were to get involved ornate tow, what would that look like? >> i would not have a large footprint as you've heard some people in the pentagon say 75,000 troops. i think we can use a smaller footprint, use air power, put a no-fly zone over syria, go in and seize those. the
, you know, when we think senator demint we think of a tea party stronghold within the u.s. senate and helped and also hurt a number of republican candidates. who were they? >> reporter: that's right. great. let's start with the senators now. obviously, who he helped elect. this is the positive side of his millions and his work. marco rubio, pat toomey. very conservative, anti-tax, anti-government purists in the mold of jim demint. however, he also backed in republican primaries a number of republican candidates who simply were not electable according to the republican establishment and the establishment was right. for example, remember christine o'donnell, i'm not a witch, from delaware. ken buck of colorado. and others. so those are some of the reasons why he definitely has ruffled many a-feather with the party leaders and i have to tell you first thing i saw when the senate republican leader mitch mcconnell released a statement today was making the point that demint had, quote, uncompromising service. didn't have to read between the lines too much to see there's a backhanded com
secretary leon panetta announcing that the u.s. is sending patriot missiles and troops to turkey to deal with the growing threat from the neighboring syria. 400 troops will join nato forces and stand ready to act if syria intends to unleash chemical weapons. fox's leland vittert is in our middle east bureau. leland, just a few days ago the head of nato said the assad regime is about to collapse. why deploy these troops now? >> reporter: it really has to do with showing solidarity with the turks who are clearly very scared and timing comes a couple days after we learned that the syrians were mixing chemical weapons to possibly use. so this is the united states and nato's way of really get being behind turkey, a close ally saying we support you. the secretary of defense was quick to point out that the patriot missiles are just that, defensive weapons that will be put down along the syrian border to protect syria, protect turkey from attacks by syrian jets or scud missiles that would fly in but that is not exactly the whole story. the patriots could be easily programmed and put in a no-fly
problems with an engine. the u.s. and south korea are condemning the north's second launch attempt this year. an earlier one failed in april. the u.s. and south korea say the launch is a cover for ballistic missile testing. >>> barriers are going up outside the presidential palace in egypt as the nation moves closer to saturday's planned constitutional referendum. the palace has been the site of clashes between those for and against president mohamed morsi after he gave himself unchecked powers last month. the opposition is calling for new nationwide protests ahead of the vote. >>> and the nobel peace prize has been given to the european union. the three presidents of the eu's main bodies accepted the prestigious award this morning at a ceremony in oslo, norway, but this year's choice was not without controversy. three former nobel laureates wrote a letter of protest saying the union doesn't qualify as a peace maker. >>> for the second time in two weekds, an nfl team overcomes the death of a teammate with a victory on the field. this time it was the dallas cowboys. on the sidelines
's palace. we'll have a live report from cairo. but, first, u.s. military plans about possible action against syria are changing. senior pentagon officials tell cnn the syrian government could be escalating the civil war. there are new concerns the assad regime is preparing to use chemical weapons. let's get to our pentagon correspondent barbara starr. barbara, how does this change the u.s. military's syria plan? are we talking u.s. troops, boots on the ground? >> well, not at this point, clearly, deb. but what we do know is that u.s. officials tell us that they are updating some of the military options for action against syria's chemical weapons capability, why are they doing this? of course, we chatted about this in the last several days. officials say they do have the intelligence now that syria has filled aerial bombs with deadly sarin gas. haven't moved it to airplanes yet, but this is very concerning because that, of course, would be the next step. so once you have the deadly bombs, the u.s. has to look at what the options could be, what they might want to target to essentially
piper is in bangkok, thailand. what is the reaction across asia to this launch, david? >> reporter: u.s. allies, japan, south korea condemn the action. philippines, where the rocket landed 200 miles off its shore protested. japan is particularly upset because it flew over the okinawa islands where there is large u.s. presence. south korea is calling for more u.s. sanctions. the most important, china, they are saying want a moderate and prudent response. may well go to the u.n. security council this morning. back to you. martha: so how important is it for north korea's missile regime, missile program i should say they were able to launch this weapon successfully? they have seen several failures in the past? >> reporter: well it is a major scientific achievement if you look at it on that level even though a lot of their people are starving in the country. from what the experts are saying they're still a long way off from being able to fire a ballistic missile with a nuclear warhead. there is problems with the heat from reentry, things like that. but it's, they are moving towards that ball
information from that u.s. drone they say they captured. the information that the iranians say now proves that the u.s. was spying on iran's military sites and its oil terminals. the u.s. has been trying to block iran's oil exports as part of an effort to get iran to give up it's nuke program, but as for the drone, a defense official says no u.s. navy drone is missing. >>> we're about to take you live to cairo. that is where riot police are bracing now for another night of violent street fighting, tear gas all over the city today. this week crowds of egyptians have now stormed the presidential palace, breaking through fences, fighting with security forces, trying to keep them back. now, the protesters, they are furious about several things. first of all, all concerning president mohammed morsi and this growing perception that he is making himself too powerful. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. >> opposition factions back protesting against mohammed morrissey for nearly two weeks. most of the protests have been limited to tahrir square, but they're now going to the source of their anger, presi
2004 to 2010. and not just football. conditions happen in the u.s. each and every year. martha: belcher is not the first nfl player to recently take his life. junior say oh and dave diewr on both died of self-inflicted gunshot wounds. we'll talk to jim coming up in the next hour. >> 6 minutes past the hour. former president george herbert walker bush waking up in a houston hospital. said to be in stable condition being treated for a bronchitis-related cough. he's 91 years old. he has been visited by several of his children including former president george w. bush. hopefully he will be going home very soon. martha: there are around the clock demonstrations in egypt as president morsi and the muslim brotherhood push through a hard-line islamist constitution. morsi supporters blocked them from entering the courthouse in order to give a ruling on this constitution. steve harrigan joins us from there. where do we stand now with this constitutional court having no ability to rule at this point? >> reporter: the most unusual situation in cairo where you have egypt's top court whose judges now
headline out of syria. >> new concerns as the u.s. may have to intervene in the bloody civil war in that country. this morning, we're learning that syrian dictator, bashar al assad's forces have done in recent days that's alarmed u.s. officials and prompted a stern warning from president obama. and abc's martha raddatz is here with the details this morning. good morning, martha. >> reporter: good morning, josh. this morning, a u.s. official is confirming that over the weekend, the syrian military loaded elements of the deadly nerve gas, sarin, on to bombs on or near syrian airfields. there's 40 chemical weapons sites like this one. one drop of sarin can kill you within minutes. the theory is that the sarin bombs could be put on syrian warplanes to use against the opposition forces. there's no way to know for certain if that was the plan. but president obama was so concerned, he issued that strong warning on monday. and since then, there has been no activity at those airfields. and the syrian government insists it will not use chemical weapons. but that does not mean this threat h
maker based in the u.s. the company received $133 million in federal stimulus grngrnt grants before going under. republicans called the case a textbook example of wasted stimulus money. >>> "usa today," controversy surrounding the korean pop sensation psy. he performed last night at the christmas in washington concert with the president and his family in attendance. he has that dance, you know? >> you know, everybody, like, sends me videos of them doing this. i have no idea what it is. >> "gangnam style." >> is that how you say it? >> yeah. >> oh, you know what? i prefer to be out of it on this one. >> so this was just days after video surfaced of him using inflammatory anti-american language and leading anti-u.s. protests at a concert in 2004 amid the heat of the iraq war. the song, which is a cover called for killing, quote, yankees. on friday psy issued an apology saying he understands american servicemen's sacrifices and regrets using the inflammatory language. >> it was really harsh language that he used, but you know what? a lot of people said a lot of stupid things again. i w
contact the u.s. embassy. he can seek help in that regard, which we have heard he has not done. on top of that, he could get an attorney and represent himself, but he does say this rr he says, that would be the first thing to do, get an attorney. what would the attorney say? don't talk to police. he said i'm just doing that without having to pay for an attorney. at time he's extremely lucid and other times you talk to him, it almost sounds like he's living in an alternative universe with an idea of a government plot against him. >> martin savidge, fascinating, live for us there in belize. thanks so much. >>> police in arizona want to find an 11-year-old girl with leukemia whose mom took her from the hospital. take a look at these surveillance photos of the family leaving phoenix children's hospital wednesday's morning. the little girl still has a catheter implanted in her heart. doctors are afraid it will get infected and she'll die. doctors aren't sure why they left. she was supposed to be released the next day. they add her parents aren't suspects and aren't wanted for any crime, but
on to aerial bomb that is could be dropped on the syrian people. monday cnn reported that u.s. officials believed that the syrians had begun mixing chemicals that could be used to weaponize sarin, but there were no signs that the syrian regime was going to do anything with those weapons. they maintain yet again today that they have no intention of using chemical weapons in syria. carol? >> mohammed jamjoom in beirut this morning. >>> sad ending for a month-long search of two missing cousins. the bodies of 8-year-old elizabeth collins and 10-year-old lyric cook were found by hunters in the wooded area. the two girls have been missing since july. jim spellman has been following the story since lyric and elizabeth went missing. you know, i know the families were hopeful till the end. what a saddened. >> yeah, indeed. we haven't gotten official word from police that the two podiatries found by these hunters were the little girls but the family told me right from the beginning there was no doubt that there was them. overnight a facebook post from elizabeth's mom confirming it. they knew from
, mike. thank you. >>> now number three of our first five web stories in a move u.s. officials are calling provocative, north korea is planning to launch a long-range rocket this month. state department officials say the launch will use ballistic missile technology and is a threat to peace in the region. attempted launches by north korea in the past have barely gotten off the ground including a failed launch in april. ford c-max hybrid. when you're carrying a lot of weight, c-max has a nice little trait, you see, c-max helps you load your freight, with its foot-activated lift gate. but that's not all you'll see, cause c-max also beats prius v, with better mpg. say hi to the all-new 47 combined mpg c-max hybrid. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. >>> tech watch now "weekends with alex witt." sales
involves an international treaty and it is being argued in front of the u.s. supreme court. there is a lot to this. let me let our justice correspondent joe johns explain. take a listen. >> reporter: aris chapin is a beautiful 5-year-old in the middle of a bitter custody battle between two parents at the end of a rocky marriage. >> my daughter, she's my -- she's my sparkle. she's everything. she's everything for me. >> if my daughter returns to the united states, i believe i will never see her again. >> reporter: it is a complicated legal fight dealing with international borders and treaties and important enough that the u.s. supreme court has taken the case. the last time aris was in the u.s. her father shot this video of her, but now she lives in scotland, where her mother lynn is from. a federal judge ruled that lynn could legally take aris back to scotland, despite her father's objections. he says aris shouldn't be with her mother, because lynn has a drinking problem. >> i don't think that somebody with an issue, an alcohol issue like that, can take care of a child. definitely on their
syrian rebels in an effort to end assad's regime. the u.s. doesn't plan to provide arms to the rebels. >>> and from our parade of papers, "the dallas morning news." north korea has defied international warnings, firing another long-range rocket. the second such launch under new leader kim jong-un. korean state tv claims the launch was successful and that the rocket delivered a, quote, peaceful satellite into orbit. >>> this is a big morning now. >> it is. he's here. >> he's here in the flesh in new york city in the studio. >> 12-12-12. happy 12-12-12. >> top 12 reasons, something. >> willie and i since 11-11-11 -- >> i was watching you. >> and we're, like, on the holiday inn over on 57th. we're going to be ready when it's 12-12-12 because that's going to be a special day. we'll make a top 12 list of the things a man should do to -- >> and we want to get this right. >> we're going to get it right. >> because we were so wrong about y2k. >> we really were. >> the millennium. >> we really were. you know what? let's not kill hamlet in the first act. we're going to give you our special top
, it would be a fact, and it would be a fact that here's a black u.s. senator from the deep south. that would be significant, i think. and a big step for the party. >> do you have a view on this, congressman? >> i do. i have a view on almost everything. >> you fit right in, my man. you fit right in. >> the good news is that there is revolutionary thinking going on in the republican party. tim scott is a conservative, 1,000 times more conservative than me, but i like tim scott because he's a good guy. he doesn't say crazy things. he doesn't attack people with nasty labels. so he's a good guy. keep in mind, however, that -- and i think this is a mistake the republican party has made -- that they assume that if they reach out to african-americans, meaning run radio spots on black radio, that that's reaching out. that's not. there are policy changes that are going to take place. and tim scott's going to have essentially the same policies that demint had. he's going to embrace those policies. >> gene, i want to ask you a question, and then i want the chairman to answer it. it's interesting you men
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)